Category Archives: Then and Now

THEN AND NOW: Trash Boom in the Los Angeles River


Here are two pictures of the trash boom at the mouth of the Los Angeles River – one taken yesterday before the rain and one taken this morning.
Workers from Frey Environmental maintain the trash boom in Long Beach. Steve Zieg said that usually by this time of year they’ve collected about 1,000 tons of debris, but so far only collected 150 tons, not including today’s storm.

THEN AND NOW: Jergin's Trust Building, 1986 & 2012

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TOP: View of Ocean Blvd. and Pine Ave. looking southeast on August 13, 1986. The Jergin’s Trust Building is on the right, in the center is the Crocker Bank Building (now the Salvation Army Building), and on the left is Breakers. The Jergin’s Trust Building was named for the Jergin’s Trust oil company, which built a four storey addition in the early 1920s. The Lowe’s State Theater occupied the lower part of the building. In a 1986 Los Angeles Times Article, Tom Welch, who represented the developer at the time said, The project already has cost $125,000 and demolition of the 10-story building will cost another $550,000. “We wouldn’t want to spend that kind of money if we intended to leave bare soil,” he added, in reference to a battle by some to save the building. Photo by Tom Shaw/Press-Telegram

BOTTOM: View of Ocean Blvd. and Pine Ave. looking southeast on February 14, 2012. The Long Beach Convention Center is the low building on the right, in the center is the Salvation Army Building, and on the left is Breakers. Photo by Jeff Gritchen/Long Beach Press-Telegram

THEN AND NOW: Norwalk's Front Street, 1948 and 2012

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NORWALK, CAILF., USA — The northwest corner of Front Street and Clarkdale Ave. in Norwalk, Calif. on in 1948. Norwalk was founded in the late 19th century but not incorporated as a city unitll 1957.

By 1873, railroads were being built in the area and the Sprouls deeded 23 acres (93,000 m) stipulating a “passenger stop” clause in the deed. Three days after the Anaheim Branch Railroad crossed the “North-walk” for the first time, Gilbert Sproul surveyed a town site. In 1874, the name was recorded officially as Norwalk. While a majority of the Norwalk countryside remained undeveloped during the 1880s, the Norwalk Station allowed potential residents the opportunity to visit the “country” from across the nation.

At the turn of the 19th century, Norwalk had become established as a dairy center. Of the 50 local families reported in the 1900 census, most were associated with farming or with the dairy industry. Norwalk was also the home of some of the largest sugar beet farms in all of Southern California during this era. Many of the dairy farmers who settled in Norwalk during the early part of the 20th century were Dutch. See more Then and Nows>>

THEN AND NOW: Johnies/Bob's Broiler, 2008 & 2011

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TOP: Johnies Broiler in Downey , Calif. on March 7, 2008. Johnie’s was a restaurant from 1958 until 2001. From 2002-2006 it was a used car dealership. On Sunday, Jan. 7, 2007 Ardas Yanik began an illegal demolition of Johnie’s Broiler. No demolition permits had been issued for the property. Bulldozers began their work around 3 p.m. Yanik pleaded no contest to three misdemeanor charges stemming from the demolition and had his lease forfeited.
Bottom: The renovated Johnies Broiler, now Bob’s Big Boy Broiler, in Downey , Calif. on July 17, 2011.
Photos by Jeff Gritchen/Long Beach Press-Telegram

THEN AND NOW: Broadway, 1920s/1930s & 2011

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LEFT: View looking west on Broadway from American Avenue sometime in the late 1920s or early 1930s. American Avenue is now Long Beach Blvd. Pacific Tower, built in 1923 is at right and the Middough Building is in the center.
RIGHT: View looking west on Broadway from Long Beach, Blvd. on June 21, 2011. At right is the Pacific Tower, built in 1923. In the center is the Insurance Exchange Building Lofts. The Insurance Exchange Building was known as the Middough Building when it opened in 1925. The building was built by Lorne and Way Middough who moved their men’s and boy’s clothing store into the first floor. In 1931, the Middough brothers sold the building, and its name was changed to the Insurance Exchange Building. Photo by Jeff Gritchen / Long Beach Press-Telegram

THEN AND NOW: Community Hospital Long Beachm, 1930s & 2011

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TOP: Community Hospital of Long Beach sometime in the 1930s. The hospital was founded in 1924 as Long Beach Community Hospital with 100 beds and 175 surgeons and physicians on staff. In 1980, the hospital was deignated as a Historical Landmark.

BOTTOM: Community Hospital of Long Beach, which opened in1924 has gone through many owners. Today it is part of the MemorialCare Health System and simple know as Community Hospital Long Beach. The hospital has 536-employee. In March, the City Council agreed to end the city’s lease with Community and start a new lease with Long Beach Memorial for the city-owned building at 1720 Termino Ave., which sits on 8.7 acres. The 20-year lease, which can be extended to a total of 55 years, allows Memorial to take on Community’s needs there, including the $16 million state-mandated seismic retrofit of the building.

THEN AND NOW: Long Beach Earthquake, 1933 & 2011

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TOP: The Ebell Club on the corner of 3rd. Street and Cerritos Ave. in Long Beach, Calif. after it was damaged in a 6.3 earthquake that struck on March 10, 1933. The building was built in 1924 as an exclusive social club for women in Long Beach. The building was rebuilt, then rededicated on December 4, 1933. Changes in the building include; a courtyard covered with skylights where it had previously been open air, and the fountain was not replaced.
BOTTOM:The Ebell Club on the corner of 3rd. Street and Cerritos Ave. in Long Beach, Calif. on March 9, 2011. The building was restored in 2004 and now houses 25,858 square feet of event space.

THEN AND NOW: Pine Avenue, the 1930s & 2011

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RIGHT: View of Pine Avenue looking north from Ocean Blvd. in the 1930s. The clock tower on the left, and the Security Building on the right are still standing today. Far in the distance, on the right, you can also see the Farmers & Merchants Bank Building that is also still standing.
LEFT: View of Pine Avenue looking north from Ocean Blvd. on January 6, 2011.

THEN AND NOW: Eli Rodriguez and Jason Gutierrez, 2009 & 2010

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TOP: During the 2009 Long Beach Marathon runner Jason Gutierrez seized up and had to stop in the last miles of the race. Eli Rodriguez passed him and went on to win the race in 2 hours and 27 minutes.
BOTTOM: During the 2010, long after Jason Gutierrez had won the race in 2 hours and 14 minutes. Eli Rodriguez is forced to stop and stretch about 100 yards from the finish line. Rodriguez finished the 26.2-mile race in 2 hours and 40 minutes.

THEN AND NOW: East on Ocean Ave., 1925 & 2010

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TOP:View looking east on Ocean Blvd. in Long Beach, Calif. circa 1925. The FIrst National Bank Building (Enloe Building), with clock tower on far left, and the Security Building, behind clock tower and, the Breakers, right, are still standing.
BOTTOM: The First National Bank building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The original bank building had three stories, which were surpassed in 1906 with the current building. The clock tower with its six-foot-diameter clock face was added in 1907. The structure was designed in a French Renaissance Revival style utilizing pressed yellow brick on the street sides and common red brick on the remaining two sides.

THEN AND NOW: Broadway & Chestnut, late 1980s & 2010

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LEFT: View looking west on Broadway at Chestnut Ave. circa the late 1980s. This street was the perfect place to find a bail bondsman since it is across from the Long Beach (Calif.) police department.
RIGHT: View looking west on Broadway at Chestnut Ave. on July 13, 2010, in Long Beach, Calif. The new Gallery421 apartment community is on the right.

THEN AND NOW: Ocean Blvd. from Pacific Ave, 1920s & 2010

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TOP: LONG BEACH, CALIF. USA — View looking east on Ocean Blvd. from Pacific Avenue in Downtown Long Beach, Calif. in the 1920s. Photo from the Historical Collections of Security First National Bank
BOTTOMView looking east on Ocean Blvd. from Pacific Avenue in Downtown Long Beach, Calif. on June 3, 2010. The only building still standing today is the Breakers in the middle of the picture.

THEN AND NOW: Shoreline Drive, 1982 & 2010

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TOP: View looking west on Shoreline Drive from Pine Ave. on October 8, 1982. ORIGINAL CAPTION: Arco towers, second building from left, is one of several new sleek modern structures. Photo by Curt Johnson / Long Beach Press-Telegram

BOTTOM: View looking west on Shoreline Drive from Pine Ave. on May 11, 2010. The rollercoast bridge conneting shops at the Pike partially blocks the view of ‘sleek modenr’ buildings in Downtown Long Beach. The Arco Towers are in the center of the picure. Photo by Jeff Gritchen / Long Beach Press-Telegram

THEN AND NOW: Ocean Blvd. from the roof of the Breakers, 1975 & 2010

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TOP: View of Ocean Blvd between Pine Ave. and Locust Ave. from the northwest corner of the roof of the Breakers Building in Long Beach, Calif. on June 11, 1976. City Hall, center, is under construction. A portion of te Jergens Trust bulding is at left.
BOTTOM:View of Ocean Blvd between Pine Ave. and the Promenade from the northwest corner of the roof of the Breakers Building in Long Beach, Calif. on May 10, 2010. The curved driveway from the Jergens Trust building is all that remains at the southeast corner of Pine Ave. and Ocean Blvd.